Posts in category "Books on Cancer"

Telling cancer's story

In 1971, Richard Nixon declared war on cancer when he signed the “National Cancer Act.” He said that he hoped this would be remembered as his administration’s most “significant act.” Unfortunately for the American people, his most remembered, and probably most significant, impact was a burglary that launched a thousand crimes. In the war against... Read more »

Food and cancer: 7 essential books

After yesterday’s post about making sweet potato griddle cakes, several people asked me about cookbooks. In the gallery below, I’ve posted the ones I’ve discovered over the past year. Two are about the integrative medicine, laying the groundwork for the importance of food in a healthy life. They may be a bit heavy going but... Read more »

Sucking It Up: Three Ways to Prevent Cancer

Sucking It Up: Three Ways to Prevent Cancer
Last night I told my cancer support group that I smoked before I was diagnosed with cancer. It’s hard to look into the eyes of people, some of whom are very sick, all of whom have suffered more than I have, most of whom have never smoked and talk to them about smoking. It’s been... Read more »
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Funerals are for us, not them

Funerals are for us, not them
I’ve been thinking about funerals lately. Not because I want to, mind you. Just because people I know have been dying. And a few are in the wings. I guess we all are. A friend died a few months ago, and his family didn’t have a funeral because he didn’t want one. I get that,... Read more »

Eating for cancer: food is love and food is healing

Eating for cancer: food is love and food is healing
The loving and healing properties of food are twofold. When you’re feeling powerless, watching someone suffer from illness or suffer with grief, cooking and feeding is empowering. And, it literally meets a need by providing nutrition and sometimes by providing healing. Growing up in a Baptist preacher’s family, I learned at a very young age... Read more »

We need to do death better

We don’t do death very well in this culture. We corral it, put makeup on it, assign stages to it, and then lock ourselves in the closet to weep. We don’t know what it looks like or feels like, how to talk about it, or listen to others talk about it. We need to do... Read more »
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