From Seneca, Stonewall And Selma

These words from the President's Inaugural Address are not in the order they were said on Monday, but each has a particular meaning to me in this order.

Seneca Falls, N.Y., where women gathered in numbers for the first time to speak on Womens Rights and issues.It must be noted that there were men in attendance, as well. What brave souls those men must have been to challenge the accepted views of women in the 1800s.
What a concept, meeting to discuss the ills that face a particular group or segment of the people.Everyone having a voice, a thought, a hope and an opportunity to express them.
Women should have the right to vote, not popular then, maybe still not in some quarters.But it was a Right that was granted, despite the protestations of many who fought against it.
More Women were elected to the Senate in the last election than ever before.To quote an old commercial "You've Come A Long Way, Baby".

Stonewall was just a bar where a fight broke out, wow that never happens, but it changed the lives of those who felt the unfranchisement of just being themselves.
Gay people could not gather in any place for fear of raids, intended to keep them hidden and quiet. The fighting back brought the abuse to the forefront, so many would never have known that their bothers, sisters, other relatives and friends,could be arrested for going to a bar, to be with people like themselves.
The LGBT community has made strides since Stonewall, but as with any accomplishment, there is more to be done.

And Selma where marches, protests and speeches were the catalyst for change.
This one should be so easy, but change never comes easy.
As this President repeated, what another said many years before, "All men are created equal".

Let's hope these milestones in Human Rights for all, was not heralded in vain.

My take away was spoken by a King, "Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere".

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  • "The arm of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice."

    Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

  • In reply to Aquinas wired:

    We can only hope it remains so.

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