Category: Rat in The Toilet

The Rule of Law; Protect Mueller to Protect Democracy

The Rule of Law is the belief that we all are equal under the law, no matter who you are or who you know. Without the Rule of Law, you might end up like Victor. Victor was an honest, gentlemanly Mexican who worked as our chauffeur in the challenging traffic of Mexico City. At least... Read more »

Pedro the Parabolic Pirate and DIRECTV

Moving to Mexico City in the mid 1990s, was no big deal to a lifelong expatriate like Annie. But she did have to admit that there was one thing she’d miss terribly, her beloved PBS. US-based friends said, what about DIRECTV? DIRECTV? In Mexico City, Mexico? She’d already learned of those who’d say, “Oh you’re... Read more »

Under the Ceiling Fans; Friendships Evolve

  Moving 18 times throughout 7 countries in 45 years, taught me one fact of life. You cannot pack up friendships in a box to take with you when you move. You will have to start from scratch to remake these very important relationships, spending time and energy to rebuild new ones. But somethings can... Read more »
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Adventures in Rabies and Tetanus in the 3rd World

The Dog Bite In the spring of 1962, 11-year-old Gary was settled in with his family to their new home in Lima, Peru. As the boy made his way to the American Society’s library to pick up a book, he encountered a few dogs congregated at the doorway. Having never met a dog he didn’t love,... Read more »

Miguel's Tasks; or fluency doesn't equate understanding

Linguistic fluency doesn’t mean you will communicate clearly, it only means that you ought to. For although my husband and I are both native English speakers, from time to time even we miscommunicate with a remarkable ease. So in Ecuador in 1986 it wasn’t uncommon for fluent Spanish speakers to hit vocabulary speed bumps. Take... Read more »

The Mutiny on the 7-2-7

In the mid-1970s, Gary and I decided to go back to Lima, Peru to visit his parents before they moved back to America after over a dozen years abroad. Peru was pretty much the same. If anything, it seemed to be economically worse off. As I sat alone in a car, young women would approach... Read more »
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Whatcha Sniffing, Peru?

Gary had told me the story of Huaraz, the town buried under a mudslide in 1970. So having some time and a bit of money for a weekend getaway, we decided to fly there from Lima, Peru in 1972. While his airline ticket said the flight was to leave at 8:00 a.m, mine said the very... Read more »

Ecuador's Protectionist Tariffs

In the USA in 1986 there were a crazy amount of choices of vehicles to buy. In Guayaquil, Ecuador there was one and only one. The locally made Jeep Trooper. Any thing else had to be imported and came with a 400% tariff, enough of a financial hit to encourage buyers to only buy locally.... Read more »

View from the Loo

“I’m off to the loo,” I announced to no one in particular one fine Mexican day. “The what?” questioned the curious new woman fresh off the airplane from America. “The loo,” I repeated. “The restroom,” I translated. Or the servicio, as it was called in Mexico. Or the toilet as it was called in much of... Read more »
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The Journey to Somewhere, Travel in Peru 1970s

In the Peru of 1972 long distance bus travel was an exercise in persistence, patience, luck and having a very large bladder. The day before traveling, my fluent-Spanish-speaking husband Gary, our 16-year-old niece and I walked down to the Hidalgo Bus Company to inquire about tickets, times and the cost of a trip to the... Read more »
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    Candace Drimmer

    I was an accidental expatriate; love and marriage led me to it. One day I was a bandy-legged kid sitting atop my dogwood tree looking out of my small backyard world in 1950s New Jersey, wanting to move somewhere--anywhere, different. Next thing I knew my father had accepted a job in Houston TX. I was ecstatic, it was a foreign land in 1961 America. After high school graduation, my parents’ gave me a matched set of fawn-colored hardsided American Tourister luggage. Taking the hint, I went to college; well four colleges in five years--it was the 60s after all. Meeting a young hirsute anti-war, soon-to-be-Peace Corps volunteer, I fell in love. After finishing up college coursework for my degree, but before I even walking a graduation stage, I grabbed the paper airline ticket my boyfriend had sent me, my brand-new passport, and was off to the airport and Lima, Peru.

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