Category: Politics

The Rule of Law; Protect Mueller to Protect Democracy

The Rule of Law is the belief that we all are equal under the law, no matter who you are or who you know. Without the Rule of Law, you might end up like Victor. Victor was an honest, gentlemanly Mexican who worked as our chauffeur in the challenging traffic of Mexico City. At least... Read more »

Why I do NOT like tribe mentalities (even within my so-called tribe)

What is your tribe? This question intruded into head when assigned the book, Tribe by Sebastian Junger for a local book club. As a child, I was unconsciously part of the WASP tribe, one that had an appropriate sting for anyone who dared to color outside the lines. Friends of my parents adopted as aunts/uncles slammed... Read more »

My Sex Assault; Why Christine Blasey Ford's Testimony Set Me Free

Watching Dr. Christine Blasey Ford give witness to her sex assault by Kavanaugh, I feel empowered to give witness to my sex assault. But I am afraid. In the era of soulless trolls, as more than one friend has counselled, it will open me up for derision and disbelief. But, as Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey... Read more »
Advertisement:

What to do without television? Oy vey!

Under my parents emotional and financial pressure, I was extricated from my first college to transfer to the Henry W. Grady School of Journalism at University of Georgia in 1968. In revenge I majored in Radio-Television-Film, a field of study that offered theater as a minor, and the opportunity to not have to take a... Read more »

The Ugly American

Lima, Peru-1972-1973 English books being in limited supply, I was often desperate to read something, anything, in English. So I re-read The Bible and parts of whatever encyclopedia was on the shelf. It’s hard to run out of multi-volume encyclopedias. Among one happy find was the 1958 bestseller book by Eugene Burdick and William Lederer, The... Read more »

Hate Mail; Why the First Amendment is First

The first time I exercised the First Amendment with a published letter to the editor in The Houston Post, a man called me at home. I didn’t answer since I was a freshman in high school. But from what my mother told me, she him off and to never call again. Over the years, I’ve... Read more »
Advertisement:

The Journey to Somewhere, Travel in Peru 1970s

In the Peru of 1972 long distance bus travel was an exercise in persistence, patience, luck and having a very large bladder. The day before traveling, my fluent-Spanish-speaking husband Gary, our 16-year-old niece and I walked down to the Hidalgo Bus Company to inquire about tickets, times and the cost of a trip to the... Read more »

Before Donald J. Trump, Ecuador's Flirtation with a Clown President

Before there was America’s clown president, Donald J. Trump, there was Ecuador’s almost clown president, Abdala Bucaram Ortiz. Brothers from different mothers, these boys? Both shamelessly aspired to fame via infamy, for bad press was far worse than no press; Both admired, emulated and cozied up to authoritarians; Both trawled the bottom of humanity for support; Both... Read more »

Raised by Bigoted Racists

Why do some Americans still fight the Civil War?, asked Jason Wilson in Charlottesville VA in The Guardian. Ask my dead parents who worked hard to poison me with their racist bigotry as they wrapped their rebel flag around my neck. My mother Virginia was born in South Georgia and didn’t consider herself a racist. “Some of... Read more »
Advertisement:

St. Patrick's Day; a reminder of bigotry toward the immigrant

On St. Patrick’s Day, everyone identifies as Irish as we hoist green beer–or in Chicago, whoo-hoo the green river–celebrating all things Irish. And yet we forget. It’s happened all too often before. It is happening again. In these days when those in charge of the Federal Government want to stigmatize a person by their place of... Read more »
  • Advertisement:
  • Advertisement:
  • ChicagoNow is full of win

    Welcome to ChicagoNow.

    Meet our bloggers,
    post comments, or
    pitch your blog idea.

  • Meet The Blogger

    Candace Drimmer

    I was an accidental expatriate; love and marriage led me to it. One day I was a bandy-legged kid sitting atop my dogwood tree looking out of my small backyard world in 1950s New Jersey, wanting to move somewhere--anywhere, different. Next thing I knew my father had accepted a job in Houston TX. I was ecstatic, it was a foreign land in 1961 America. After high school graduation, my parents’ gave me a matched set of fawn-colored hardsided American Tourister luggage. Taking the hint, I went to college; well four colleges in five years--it was the 60s after all. Meeting a young hirsute anti-war, soon-to-be-Peace Corps volunteer, I fell in love. After finishing up college coursework for my degree, but before I even walking a graduation stage, I grabbed the paper airline ticket my boyfriend had sent me, my brand-new passport, and was off to the airport and Lima, Peru.

  • Twitter

  • Subscribe

    Enter your email address:

    Delivered by FeedBurner

  • Categories

  • Tags

  • Latest on ChicagoNow

  • Advertisement: