Category: Living Abroad

Expatriate Networking, Mexican-style 1995

Moving into our home in Mexico City in the summer of 1995, we encountered unique challenges unheard of in Westport, Connecticut. Like having the telephone company appear at the door to ask if we wanted our telephone service connected? Oh, yes please. Well to do that would cost us the equivalent of US$200 in cash. If... Read more »

The Rocks In the Basement; The Solar/Aquatic Society of Curacao

When living in Curacao without the possibility of a work visa, a group of expatriate women went snorkeling every Wednesday morning. Despite 6 of the 7 of us having children–or maybe because, it was a child-free group. The chance for an uninterrupted, complete sentence conversation with a group of adult women was just too good... Read more »

Thankful for the Small Expatriate World

Within months of arriving in Lima, Peru in 1972, my boyfriend Gary and I were on a street downtown. Greeted by someone who knew him, I asked, “Who was that?” “Oh, one of the Peace Corps volunteers who came to my parents house to take a bath.” Now why hadn’t I thought of that? As... Read more »
Advertisement:

The Rule of Law; Protect Mueller to Protect Democracy

The Rule of Law is the belief that we all are equal under the law, no matter who you are or who you know. Without the Rule of Law, you might end up like Victor. Victor was an honest, gentlemanly Mexican who worked as our chauffeur in the challenging traffic of Mexico City. At least... Read more »

My Antisemitism Experience(s)

“Well, Candace is still married to that JEW Boy!” In the late 1990s I stood outside the bedroom door of my 80-something year old father only to hear him slander the man I’d loved and lived with for over 25 years. I was stunned, but not surprised. After all, hadn’t the bigotry storyline been a... Read more »

Pedro the Parabolic Pirate and DIRECTV

Moving to Mexico City in the mid 1990s, was no big deal to a lifelong expatriate like Annie. But she did have to admit that there was one thing she’d miss terribly, her beloved PBS. US-based friends said, what about DIRECTV? DIRECTV? In Mexico City, Mexico? She’d already learned of those who’d say, “Oh you’re... Read more »
Advertisement:

Why I do NOT like tribe mentalities (even within my so-called tribe)

What is your tribe? This question intruded into head when assigned the book, Tribe by Sebastian Junger for a local book club. As a child, I was unconsciously part of the WASP tribe, one that had an appropriate sting for anyone who dared to color outside the lines. Friends of my parents adopted as aunts/uncles slammed... Read more »

Gone to the Stars; Death and Friends

“It’s terrible to lose a friend when you don’t have many.” From The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society film I lost my first friend in preschool. She and her sibling were playing with matches in their home when the unimaginable happened. The next friend I remember losing died of childhood leukemia in 1964, a time... Read more »

Munchhausen Mothers like Virginia; sick women who make their children sick

“Did your mother like being the mother of a sick child?” asked the new psychiatrist as he ended our first 90 minute session. My sleep deprived brain tried to remember the name of the book I’d read 20 years earlier about a mother poisoning her child to get attention as the mother of a chronically... Read more »
Advertisement:

Under the Ceiling Fans; Friendships Evolve

  Moving 18 times throughout 7 countries in 45 years, taught me one fact of life. You cannot pack up friendships in a box to take with you when you move. You will have to start from scratch to remake these very important relationships, spending time and energy to rebuild new ones. But somethings can... Read more »
  • Advertisement:
  • Advertisement:
  • ChicagoNow is full of win

    Welcome to ChicagoNow.

    Meet our bloggers,
    post comments, or
    pitch your blog idea.

  • Meet The Blogger

    Candace Drimmer

    I was an accidental expatriate; love and marriage led me to it. One day I was a bandy-legged kid sitting atop my dogwood tree looking out of my small backyard world in 1950s New Jersey, wanting to move somewhere--anywhere, different. Next thing I knew my father had accepted a job in Houston TX. I was ecstatic, it was a foreign land in 1961 America. After high school graduation, my parents’ gave me a matched set of fawn-colored hardsided American Tourister luggage. Taking the hint, I went to college; well four colleges in five years--it was the 60s after all. Meeting a young hirsute anti-war, soon-to-be-Peace Corps volunteer, I fell in love. After finishing up college coursework for my degree, but before I even walking a graduation stage, I grabbed the paper airline ticket my boyfriend had sent me, my brand-new passport, and was off to the airport and Lima, Peru.

  • Twitter

  • Subscribe

    Enter your email address:

    Delivered by FeedBurner

  • Categories

  • Tags

  • Latest on ChicagoNow

  • Advertisement: