Blood, guts and get-me-out-of-here; bloody bullfights

Texas had football; Peru had bullfights. In Lima, Peru in the 1960s, the world was smaller and less interactively connected. High-speed communication was by letters, telephone calls were too pricey for most. Yet even in those pre-social media days teenaged girls had crushes on teen idols. In Peru the hot teenaged idols were the bullfighters.... Read more »

Expatriate Networking, Mexican-style 1995

Moving into our home in Mexico City in the summer of 1995, we encountered unique challenges unheard of in Westport, Connecticut. Like having the telephone company appear at the door to ask if we wanted our telephone service connected? Oh, yes please. Well to do that would cost us the equivalent of US$200 in cash. If... Read more »

The Rocks In the Basement; The Solar/Aquatic Society of Curacao

When living in Curacao without the possibility of a work visa, a group of expatriate women went snorkeling every Wednesday morning. Despite 6 of the 7 of us having children–or maybe because, it was a child-free group. The chance for an uninterrupted, complete sentence conversation with a group of adult women was just too good... Read more »
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Thankful for the Small Expatriate World

Within months of arriving in Lima, Peru in 1972, my boyfriend Gary and I were on a street downtown. Greeted by someone who knew him, I asked, “Who was that?” “Oh, one of the Peace Corps volunteers who came to my parents house to take a bath.” Now why hadn’t I thought of that? As... Read more »

Right You Are IF You Think You Are*

While living in Mexico City, Hannah’s husband was about to turn 30. So like the loving wife that she was, she sought out a very special birthday present for him. But what? Then she knew, a massage at their home with the massage therapist everyone in the expatriate community was all a buzz about. Her... Read more »

The Rule of Law; Protect Mueller to Protect Democracy

The Rule of Law is the belief that we all are equal under the law, no matter who you are or who you know. Without the Rule of Law, you might end up like Victor. Victor was an honest, gentlemanly Mexican who worked as our chauffeur in the challenging traffic of Mexico City. At least... Read more »
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My Antisemitism Experience(s)

“Well, Candace is still married to that JEW Boy!” In the late 1990s I stood outside the bedroom door of my 80-something year old father only to hear him slander the man I’d loved and lived with for over 25 years. I was stunned, but not surprised. After all, hadn’t the bigotry storyline been a... Read more »

Pedro the Parabolic Pirate and DIRECTV

Moving to Mexico City in the mid 1990s, was no big deal to a lifelong expatriate like Annie. But she did have to admit that there was one thing she’d miss terribly, her beloved PBS. US-based friends said, what about DIRECTV? DIRECTV? In Mexico City, Mexico? She’d already learned of those who’d say, “Oh you’re... Read more »

Why I do NOT like tribe mentalities (even within my so-called tribe)

What is your tribe? This question intruded into head when assigned the book, Tribe by Sebastian Junger for a local book club. As a child, I was unconsciously part of the WASP tribe, one that had an appropriate sting for anyone who dared to color outside the lines. Friends of my parents adopted as aunts/uncles slammed... Read more »
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My Sex Assault; Why Christine Blasey Ford's Testimony Set Me Free

Watching Dr. Christine Blasey Ford give witness to her sex assault by Kavanaugh, I feel empowered to give witness to my sex assault. But I am afraid. In the era of soulless trolls, as more than one friend has counselled, it will open me up for derision and disbelief. But, as Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey... Read more »
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    Candace Drimmer

    I was an accidental expatriate; love and marriage led me to it. One day I was a bandy-legged kid sitting atop my dogwood tree looking out of my small backyard world in 1950s New Jersey, wanting to move somewhere--anywhere, different. Next thing I knew my father had accepted a job in Houston TX. I was ecstatic, it was a foreign land in 1961 America. After high school graduation, my parents’ gave me a matched set of fawn-colored hardsided American Tourister luggage. Taking the hint, I went to college; well four colleges in five years--it was the 60s after all. Meeting a young hirsute anti-war, soon-to-be-Peace Corps volunteer, I fell in love. After finishing up college coursework for my degree, but before I even walking a graduation stage, I grabbed the paper airline ticket my boyfriend had sent me, my brand-new passport, and was off to the airport and Lima, Peru.

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