The Dirt on Green

EcoChat Covers Organics on March 8th - Join the Discussion!

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DorotheeRoyal

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With Spring on the horizon, America's farmers are gearing up for a prosperous summer season. But as new products gain visibility and the growing organic food movement shifts consumers' spending habits, many are wondering how agriculture will be affected in the long run.

Five leaders in American agriculture will be joining the Chicago-based webshow EcoChat Monday March 8th for a discussion about sustainable food systems and the future of American agriculture. They include:

@FAMILYFARMED

Jim Slama is a social entrepreneur as the Founder and President of FAMILYFARMED.ORG. He's currently gearing up for the 5th annual Family Farmed Expo at the University of Illinois at Chicago March 11-13.

@MPAYNKNOPER
Michele Payn-Knoper is the founder of two popular, weekly moderated Twitter chats, #agchat and #foodchat. She speaks professionally about agriculture, food, nutrition and social media as the voice behind CAUSE MATTERS CORP.

@FAIRFOODFIGHT
Barth Anderson is the chief blogger at FAIR FOOD FIGHT, a social networking site dedicated to connecting eaters, growers, and sellers of fair, sustainable food. He brings twenty years of experience in natural foods to the discussion.

@CORNFEDFARMER
Brandon Hunnicutt is a 4th generation Nebraska farmer specializing in corn, soybeans, and popcorn. He's beginning his 13th year on the land and enjoys playing a little Wii with his kids every now and then.

@FOLLOWNATHAN
Nathan Winters spent five months traveling the country on a bicycle to meet America's farmers. He documented this amazing trip at FOLLOWNATHAN.ORG and is currently writing a book about this adventure.

In addition to discussing the future of American agriculture, the show will take questions from viewers about any food-related topic and provide practical advice to consumers about how to engage in their local food communities.

"We want to empower consumers by educating them about the value of different produce options and connecting them with food producers in our country," says host Alicia Ontiveros, "Yes, there are farmer's markets, but there are also co-ops and other models of community supported agriculture that many people don't know about."

Viewers can tune-in on Monday, March 8th, at 8PM CST by visiting ecochicago.blogspot.com and keep track of additional shows by following Eco on Twitter: @ecochat.

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FamilyFarmed EXPO Is Coming to Chicago!

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DorotheeRoyal

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Calling all foodies, environmentalists and people curious about sustainable living! The FamilyFarmed EXPO is coming to Chicago March 11-13th, 2010 at the UIC Forum at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Among the many exciting events on offer is the Local Food Festival Workshop Day on Saturday, March 13th where you'll hear from leaders in the sustainable food movement and get to participate in demonstrations by celebrity chefs like Rick Bayless and Paul Kahan. Workshop topics include gardening, permaculture, organic eating on a dime, raising backyard chickens, eco-friendly wines, urban beekeeping and much more!

Get your tickets before they sell out here: Order EXPO Tickets

Join the International Women's Day Celebration March 8th at Allyu Spa

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DorotheeRoyal

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This March 8th 2010, on the anniversary of International Women's Day, thousands of women from Rwanda and the Congo will stand together in peace on a bridge connecting their two countries.

This year, Chicago will be participating with their own unique celebration organized by Allyu Spa and Everyday Medicine Woman. Join them for a fabulous event  promoting peace and health around the world. There will be free samples of delicious local food from Karyn's Raw Cafe, Surf Sweets and more!

Here are more details about the event:

Monday March 8th
$10 suggested minimum donation
(all proceeds benefit Women for Women International)

5:30pm
Visit, snack and join us in creation of a peace banner.

6:30pm
Susan Lipshutz, LCSW and founder of Everyday Medicine Woman, will lead a meditation to support and connect with women throughout the world.

7:30pm
Bring our banner to the Chicago Avenue bridge!
 
No RSVP is necessary, but feel free to check out the Facebook invite. If you have questions please email allyuspa@gmail.com or call Allyu Spa at 312.755.1313. Hope to see you there!

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A Chicago Aquaponics Update

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MarkBoyer

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Earlier this winter I wrote a story for the Chicago magazine Mindful Metropolis about the possibility of urban farmers to start farming with aquaponics in Chicago (read the full article here). One of the people I interviewed for the story is John Edel, an entrepreneur who hopes to convert a large, unused building into a vertical farm with aquaponics grow beds.

When I met Edel in November, he took me to another building he had rehabbed in Chicago's Bridgeport neighborhood. Edel showed the basement where he hoped to start experimenting with some small-scale aquaponics with the help of some Illinois Institute of Technology students, but none of the systems had been finished when I visited.

Recently, I got an update from Edel, along with these neat wide-angle photos of the kits he's working on. "The system keeps improving, we have 100 tilapia fingerlings in the tank now and aeroponics above," Edel says. There's no word yet on whether Edel will be able to obtain the property he's been eying, or how soon he'd be able to get his vertical farming operation off the ground, but he's hopeful that it will happen sometime this year.

You can keep up with Edel's project by following his blog, The Plant Chicago.

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Chicago's Appetite for Aquaponics

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MarkBoyer

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The February issue of Mindful Metropolis, a Chicago magazine about green living, is on newsstands, and it features an article I wrote about several organic aquaponics farms that are planned for the city.

Here's a excerpt:

In aquaponics, the plants are fertilized with nutrients and bacteria from fish water, and the plant roots filter the water so that it can be circulated back into the fish tanks, creating a symbiotic loop between fish and plants. Growing Power actually has several urban farms in Chicago that are managed by Allen's daughter Erika, but none of them incorporate aquaponics technology. In fact, no commercial aquaponics operations exist in Chicago, because Chicago law doesn't currently allow it, but several key players would like to see that change. 

"There's nothing on the books in terms of the zoning as far as fish are concerned, but because they're living beings they're considered livestock," says 46th Ward Alderman Helen Shiller. "Well, obviously we have to separate that." 

Shiller hopes to convert the former Salvation Army building at the corner of Broadway and Sunnyside Avenue in Uptown into a multi-use building that would house aquaponics fish tanks and grow beds, an educational center, a community kitchen, and an on-site market. But she needs to address zoning issues in order for that to become a reality. 

Allen caught a break with the Growing Power property, because it was already zoned for agricultural use when he bought it. "He's the last farmer in Milwaukee," Shiller says. "You could probably not do what he's doing anywhere else in a city without having the same problems that we're having." Shiller recently raised the aquaponics issue with the Chicago Departments of Zoning and Community Development, and she hopes to see the livestock designation change within the next year. "More and more of our colleagues are saying, 'We really want to do that, so as soon as you figure it out we're going to do it,'" she says.

Read the whole story at Mindful Metropolis, where they've got a digital version of the whole magazine.

Help Green Grocer Celebrate Their 2 Year Anniversary This Sunday!

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DorotheeRoyal

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This Sunday, Green Grocer Chicago is marking their two year anniversary with an all-day long bash for their customers. And there is a lot to celebrate! The small and welcoming store features organic and locally produced foods and has been working closely with Midwestern farmers and producers to provide their customers the freshest food available while supporting our local economy.

Join the party at 1402 W Grand Ave. on January 31st from 10am-6pm. Vendors will be sampling their locally made mouth watering foods including: Milk and Honey granola, Red Hen breads, locally roasted coffee, Seedling apple cider, organic wines, Das Caramels, artisan cheeses, Pasta Puttana and Nice Cream.

Green Grocer will also be raffling off a prize every hour, with proceeds benefiting an orphanage in Haiti. Stop by between 4-6pm to say hi to the OrganicNation.tv crew, who will be selling raffle tickets. And if you can't make it until after 6pm, come in for an after-hours drink with the staff to celebrate this little business with a big mission. 

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One Year Later: President Obama's Food Policy

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MarkBoyer

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Photo credit: Official White House Flickr photostream

This article first appeared on OrganicNation.tv.

Today marks the one-year anniversary of the inauguration of President Barack Obama, and to mark the occasion, we'd like to take a look back at some of the food policy developments -- good and bad -- from his first year in office.

Sustainable foodies were high on hope when Obama won the 2008 election, and quotes like this one from the campaign fueled the optimism:

"I was just reading an article in the New York Times by Michael Pollan about food and the fact that our entire agricultural system is built on cheap oil. As a consequence, our agriculture sector actually is contributing more greenhouse gases than our transportation sector. And in the meantime, it's creating monocultures that are vulnerable to national security threats, are now vulnerable to sky-high food prices or crashes in food prices, huge swings in commodity prices, and are partly responsible for the explosion in our healthcare costs because they're contributing to type 2 diabetes, stroke and heart disease, obesity, all the things that are driving our huge explosion in healthcare costs."

But the excitement quickly faded as the newly-minted prez started assembling his staff. Food activists groaned when Obama tapped former Iowa gov Tom Vilsack as USDA secretary. Vilsack had developed a reputation for defending biotechnology and ethanol, and the Organic Consumers Association even dubbed him a "shill for Monsanto." Even though Vilsack has reaffirmed his love for GMOs and biofuels, I actually think he's taken some very positive steps towards turning USDA around since his appointment.

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Chicago Discount Day at Ferry Acupuncture

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DorotheeRoyal

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In order to make acupuncture affordable and accessible to the Chicago community, Ferry Acupuncture (1630 W. Division St.) is offering 1-hour treatments at a discount (only $50!) on Saturday, February 6, 2010.

A great way to maintain health during the winter months, acupuncture uses Chinese medicine techniques to help bring your body, mind and emotions into balance. Each treatment is a personalized fusion of acupuncture, herbal remedies, Chinese dietary therapy and lifestyle counseling.

Michelle Ferry adds the powerful element of touch to her sessions by doing energy work over the needles. She also teaches people how to use food as medicine to prevent and treat disease. Michelle treats a wide array of health imbalances including digestive problems, anxiety, depression, allergies, menopause and insomnia.

Michelle says, "My goal is to empower the patient to play an active role in his or her wellness. I can give you the tools to become well, but only you can heal yourself."

New and existing patients are welcome. Get sign-up info here, check out the Facebook invite and stay tuned via the Facebook fan page.

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Orange You Glad It's Not Tropicana?

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MarkBoyer

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When I was a kid, my mom bought cans of frozen juice concentrate from the grocery store, and we mixed it with water in a pitcher to make our juice. Then, somewhere between junior high and high school, we, like most people I knew at the time, switched over and started getting cartons of seemingly-fancier not-from-concentrate OJ.

Why did we make the move? It's hard to say exactly, but we probably thought the not-from-concentrate juice was closer to the real thing, which is exactly what Tropicana and Minute Maid (and parent companies PepsiCo and Coca-Cola) wanted us to think.

Nothing says "all-natural" like the orange with the striped straw stabbed into it that serves as Tropicana's logo. The cartons tell us that the orange stuff inside is "100% pure & natural orange juice," but as several industry experts have noted in the past year, so-called "natural" not-from-concentrate orange juice is anything but.

Last May, Alissa Hamilton published Squeezed: What You Don't Know About Orange Juice, shining some light on the OJ industry. According to Hamilton, an elaborate series of chemical procedures ensure that not-from-concentrate orange juice doesn't spoil, which is partly why it's more expensive. To store the juice, manufacturers strip it of oxygen in a process known as "deaeration," which keeps it from oxidizing. 

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VIDEO: Is Big Organic the Enemy?

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MarkBoyer

In this new OrganicNation.tv video Dorothee interviews Ken Cook, the co-founder of the Environmental Working Group, about some of the challenges faced by the organic food industry. Chief among those challenges is finding a way to expand the organic industry without loosening current standards. 

"Organic is private school for food," says Cook, quoting Dr. Phil Landrigan from Mount Sinai. "It's great if you can find it, it's great if you can afford it, but a lot of people can't."

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Chicago: Vote for Your Favorite Seed

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DorotheeRoyal

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This month, NeighborSpace is calling all Chicago gardeners to vote for their favorite prairie seed for their One Seed Chicago project.

"For the third year One Seed Chicago is uniting Chicagoans," said Ben Helphand, NeighborSpace Executive Director. "By planting a common seed, backyards, windowsills, community gardens and balconies across thie City will be linked together in a season-long celebration of urban greening."

This year the winning seed will be from a plant that was once commonly found in the prairies around Chicago, but that is now rare in the wild outside of prairie restoration projects and cultivated gardens. Once established this native plant will require little water, is less prone to diseases and attracts beneficial insects and birds to a garden. 

"Native plants attract native birds and insects and help to increase biodiversity in your garden," said Colleen Lockovitch, Director and Horticulturalist at the Lurie Garden at Millennium Park. "Our native plant friends are more adapted to their local surroundings and can handle the Chicago area's fluctuations in climate and weather."

Vote from Jan 1 until April 1st at www.oneseedchicago.com and the winning seed will be sent to you through the mail. If you don't already have a garden in your neighborhood - this is a great excuse to start one!
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Windy City (and IL) to Get More Wind Energy

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MarkBoyer

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Photo credit: Flickr user thomas.merton

Illinois is currently ranked 12th in the country for wind energy production, according to the American Wind Energy Association (PDF), but the Land of Lincoln could soon climb in the rankings.

The first reason that Illinois is fertile ground for wind energy production is pretty self evident: It's windy here. "Maps produced by the Illinois Wind Program show much of central and northern Illinois has wind that blows between 15 and 20 mph," according to the Chicago Daily Herald. Anyone who has ever ridden a bike against the wind in Chicago can attest to that.

Wind energy also has political backing in Illinois. Area enviros cheered Monday when Governor Pat Quinn announced that Alderman Manny Flores would get the nod as the new chairman of the Illinois Commerce Commission, the body that buys electricity on behalf of the utilities and sets the rates. Flores has developed a reputation for backing green investment and initiatives, and he has said that making the state a leader in wind energy will be one of his priorities.

Before Flores was appointed to the top post, the ICC took a step towards sourcing more power from wind farms. About a week ago, the Commission approved a plan to approved a plan to "negotiate long-term deals with renewable power developers for up to 3.5 percent of the utilities' electricity needs," according to a Crain's Chicago Business report.

That might not sound like a lot, especially considering that state lawmakers recently vowed to source 25 percent of Illinois' electricity from renewable energy sources by 2025, but it's a step in the right direction. At the national level, there are currently two separate bills pending in Congress that call for 3 percent or 6 percent of all electricity to come from renewable sources.

Top 10 Ways to Decrease Your Carbon Foodprint

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MarkBoyer

Here's a New Year's diet that will improve the health of the planet. 

Gallery sneak peek (10 images):

View the gallery...

Latest Green Trend: Living Jewelry

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DorotheeRoyal

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Ever wish you could take the garden with you? Well, now it's possible to bring your eco-fashion obsession to the next level by sporting living plants on your fingers!
 
According to a recent report from the UK Telegraph, an Icelandic jewelery designer has come up with the ultimate 'green' jewelry: rings with live plants growing inside them instead of precious stones.

Here are details from the story: 

Featuring tiny Icelandic moss plants sprouting in their stainless steel bases, the pieces are said to be a 'clash of jewellery and gardening'.

They need watering like any other plant and if looked after, designer Hafsteinn Juliusson claims they can last up to six months.

But they don't need to be pruned because, according to Mr Juliusson, the moss grows 'so slowly that you cant even see it.'

What do you think? Is this something you could see yourself wearing in 2010?

Special thanks to Charlotte Rutherfurd for the tip!

Photo via Hafsteinn Juliusson

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What's in Store for 2010? More Local Food

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MarkBoyer

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2009 is in the books, but as we look forward to the tweens, one trend that will likely carry over from the '90s and the aughts is the increase in the buying and selling of local food. Back in October, USDA Secretary Tom Vilsack announced that the number of farmers markets in the US increased by 13 percent -- one of the biggest increases in recent history. The USDA table above shows the number of farmers markets in the country over the past 15 years.

The increase in the absolute number of farmers markets in the country represents a shift in attitude towards food nationwide, with an increase in local and sustainably-produced food, and there's reason to believe that the trend will continue in 2010. Not only have farmers markets become more popular, but in Chicago and elsewhere new winter markets have cropped up, as we've written about here.

What's So Terrible About Asian Carp?

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MarkBoyer

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Photo credit: Kate Gardiner

In case you missed it, Michigan filed a lawsuit on Monday, asking the U.S. Supreme Court to force Illinois to close the locks of the Chicago River in order to keep invasive Asian carp from reaching the Great Lakes. Of course, this isn't the first time a neighboring state has sued in an effort to compel Chicago to close the locks. In 1900, the city dug the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal to divert waste water away from the shores of Lake Michigan.

According to the Trib, "Michigan is seeking to reopen a case dating back more than a century, when Missouri filed suit after Chicago reversed the flow of the Chicago River and began sending sewage-fouled Lake Michigan water south toward the Mississippi River."

It's pretty clear why Missouri residents were less than thrilled at the prospect of Chicagoans flushing our sewage downstream, but what's so terrible about Asian carp?

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A Green Cheat Sheet for Holiday Shoppers

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MarkBoyer

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We've posted a green gift guide and a list of very un-green holiday no-nos, but what about the iPods and plasma TVs and all the other potential gifts that didn't make those lists? Last month, the environmental consumer advocacy group Climate Counts released its third annual environmental scorecard, which grades big companies on their efforts to clean up their act.

The biggest winner this year is Nike, because the company has worked to be more transparent and has "established clear goals to reduce the company's greenhouse gas emissions." Other big winners include the organic dairy company Stonyfield Farm and Hewlett-Packard. Most of the airlines and hotels were given very low marks on the scorecard, while all of the electronics companies that were included on the scorecard are on the rise. 

Curious about the carbon footprint of your holiday gifts? Take a look at the scorecard.

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Top 10 Greenwashing Campaigns of 2009 (PHOTOS)

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MarkBoyer

According to TerraChoice Environmental Marketing, only about 2 percent of products that are labeled "eco-friendly" are entirely truthful. The other 98 percent are guilty of greenwashing to some degree. Let's take a look at some of the worst cases of greenwashing in 2009. 

Gallery sneak peek (10 images):

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Worst Environmental Offenses of the Holidays (PHOTOS)

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MarkBoyer

Gallery sneak peek (10 images):

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Why to Buy an Organic Christmas Tree

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MarkBoyer

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Photo credit: Flickr user randomdepth

People give plenty of thought to how their food is grown and where it comes from, but what about Christmas trees? They all look green, but like any monoculture Christmas trees are heavily sprayed with a cocktail of pesticides and herbicides including glyphosate, dimethoate and di-syston 15-G, according to the Organic Consumers Association.

Most of those poisons won't make it into your living room, because they wash off in the rain and snow before the tree is harvested. But some do, and because of both health and environmental concerns, some buyers are switching to either organic or natural Christmas trees.

According to a recent New York Times article, trees can be certified-organic, meaning they were raised sustainably without the use of synthetic pesticides or fertilizers. Or they can be "certified-natural," a new designation that means essentially the same thing but saves farmers time and money on paperwork and filing fees.

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Which is Greener? Real vs. Fake Christmas Trees

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MarkBoyer

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Photo credit: Douglass fir (at left) by Flickr user David Watson, artificial tree (at right) by PossibiliTree

Every year, environmentally-conscious holiday planners are confronted with an age-old dilemma: to cut down a real, live tree or to erect an artificial one.

On the one hand, cutting down a tree seems mighty wasteful. Yet there's tradition in putting up a real one, and it fills your house with a pleasant smell. On the other side of the coin, artificial trees can save you money in the long run, and they're safe for people with certain tree allergies (like me).

My answer is that Christmas tree farming isn't inherently bad. In fact, when done sustainably, tree farming can help to absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. And considering that there are approximately 350 million Christmas trees growing in the US right now, there could be great benefits to farming Christmas trees. However, the way Christmas trees are grown and disposed of after holidays are very important variables. Many tree farmers use a lot of synthetic pesticides and herbicides (I'll have more on this in a later post), and many trees end up in landfills during the first week of January.

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Humanure: Chicago's Fecal Fad

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MarkBoyer

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Dry composting toilets are all the rage these days, and Chicago is no exception. In fact, a group of West Side poop savers are at the forefront of the humanure movement (and they have a blog).

In October, GOOD magazine ran a short piece detailing the practice in Chicago. Led by urban gardener Nance Klehm, a group of 22 like-minded crappers deposit their waste into "dry toilets," or buckets of sawdust. Klehm organizes regular pickups, and takes the waste "to a secret location to avoid prosecution for violating waste disposal and storage ordinances," according to a recent Planet Green article.

Should Klehm's humble pile be deemed hazardous waste, or is it just a case of fecophobia? According to a statement on Klehm's website, not only is it safe, but it will help "prevent total systems collapse." Klehm also tests the stuff regularly for E. coli.

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Dill Pickle Food Co-op Opens in Logan Square

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MarkBoyer

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Photo credit: Dill Pickle Co-op

Since the Hyde Park Co-op shut down about two years ago, Chicago has been without a cooperative grocery store, but that all changed yesterday, when the Dill Pickle Food Co-op opened its doors at 3039 W Fullerton Ave in Logan Square.

We haven't made it over to Logan Square to check out the new grocery, but judging from the photos posted on the store's blog, it looks like they did some pretty good business on opening day.

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Our Favorite Green Gifts

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DorotheeRoyal

We scoured all the best green gift guides out there and put together a slideshow of our ten favorite picks for the 2009 holiday season, including a few DIY options and local deals. Enjoy! 

Gallery sneak peek (10 images):

View the gallery...

Chicago's Best New Organic Restaurants of 2009

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MarkBoyer

Gallery sneak peek (8 images):

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Illinois Carbon Emissions in Global Perspective

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MarkBoyer

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Did you know? The carbon emissions of Illinois and Indiana combined are roughly equal to the total emissions of Italy!

How is that possible? It doesn't tell the whole story, but this map from The Sightline Institute is an interesting way of thinking about how our local climate emissions stack up to the rest of the world.

The Sightline folks took an average of the emissions per capita between 2001 and 2003 from around the world, and looked for parallels between US states and foreign countries. They found that Illinois and Indiana, two states that combined had about 18.8 million people during that period, were producing as much greenhouse gas as the roughly 58 million people in Italy. (See the complete table here.)

The Sightline Institute found that the entire US population (which was only about 290 million in 2003) was producing as much greenhouse gas emissions as 1.5 billion people in other countries around the world.

Take a look at the full map after the jump.

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Is It Time to STOP Going Green?

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MarkBoyer

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No, this doesn't have anything to do with Sarah Palin's call for President Obama to boycott the climate talks in Copenhagen this week. Instead, the real question is, should we stop making green gestures (buying eco-friendly shampoo and organic dog food) and instead start pushing for broad political action?

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What's the Point of Organic Alcohol?

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DorotheeRoyal

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One of the of the newest trends in green living is organic or eco-friendly liquor. You've probably heard of eco-chic cocktails mixed with brands like Square One Organic Vodka or Juniper Green Organic Gin, but you may also be wondering, What's the point? We looked into the top three most commonly asked questions about organic alcohol.

Are organic drinks healthy?
It depends what you consider healthy. There are quite a few advantages to consuming alcohol that avoids pesticides, chemical fertilizers and fungicides. Not only do you ingest a cleaner, more natural product, but the ingredients are grown using methods that are healthier for farmers, our waterways and the environment.

In addition, many organic alcohol brands process and package their goods in environmentally-responsible ways. For example, Square One's bottle labels are made using bamboo pulp and soy-based inks and their fermentation byproducts are reused at local cattle farms.  
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Climate Projections: Chicago Feels Like Texas

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MarkBoyer

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While world leaders convene in Copenhagen to try to craft a strategy to deal with climate change, one question looms: What if they fail? If developed and developing nations are unable to agree on emissions regulations and current rates of climate change continue, what will Chicago look like 50 or 100 years down the road?

A report released by the U.S. Global Change Research Program in June detailed some projections of what different regions of the country will look like by the end of the 22nd century. According to the report, even with significant action is taken to limit greenhouse gas emissions, some pretty radical changes are in store for the Midwest.

Noticeable increases in temperature have already been observed in the Midwest in recent years, according to the report, and those temps are projected to continue climbing over the next century. When it does, water levels in Lake Michigan will dip by about 2 feet and Chicago's climate will look something like southern Texas. "A warmer climate generally means more ground-level ozone," according to the report, and that will lead to an increase in respiratory-related health problems.

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Best Winter Farmers Markets in Chicago

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MarkBoyer

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Green City Market - The mother of farmers markets in Chicago now stays open year-round. Whereas the summer market takes place on the southern tip of Lincoln Park, the winter market moves indoors to the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum. The market is scaled-down and occurs less frequently in the winter, but the chef demos continue. (2430 N Cannon Dr; Wed & Sat in Dec, every second Sat Jan - April, 8 a.m. - 1 p.m.)

The Empty Bottle - The Ukrainian Village music venue and bar has announced that it will host its first-ever farmers market later this month. Twelve vendors have already been set for the December market, including Videnovich Farms, Tomato Mountain Farm and Earth First Farms. Dates and vendors haven't been set for the rest of the winter, but according to the website, they plan to make it a monthly occurrence. (1035 N Western Ave; Dec 19, 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.)

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