101 Photos of the 47th annual Chicago Pride Parade

The 47th annual Chicago Pride Parade kicked off Sunday with an emotional tribute to the victims of the shooting at a gay nightclub in Orlando. #WeAreOrlando was the theme.

How did Pride begin? - The annual Pride Celebration commemorates the rebellion of LGBT patrons of the Stonewall Inn in New York City's Greenwich Village in response to a routine police raid on June 27, 1969. The following year, a "Gay-In" that took place on June 27, 1970 that was the early progenitor of the current Pride Celebration. Since 1972, the event has been held every year, Since its modest beginnings, Chicago Pride has grown to be one the largest and most well-known Pride events in the world. Pride has come to symbolize several things: the long history of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer dignity, the freedom of all people to meaningfully and proudly express their sexual and gender identities, and the commitment of LGBT people to combating oppression.

* - http://chicagopride.gopride.com/info.cfm

Updated Chicago Pride Parade history info from reader: Rick1973

Chicago’s first Pride Parade wasn’t a parade at all. On June 27, 1970 the Chicago Gay Liberation organized a march to mark one year since the Stonewall Inn Gay Riots in NYC. 150-200 homosexuals marched from Washington Square Park (Bughouse Square), down Dearborn to Chicago Avenue, east to the Water Tower which was where it was to end but many of the participants extemporaneously marched on heading south on Michigan Avenue to the Civic Center (now Daley Plaza)

In the years to follow the march would evolve into the Gay Pride Parade and finally Pride Parade to be more inclusive of the LGBTQ Community. But as someone who has seen Pride from many angles it was the time after the march up to about 1992 that I most enjoyed when it was a sort of hybrid parade/march. During those years after the last parade entry went by many of the spectators would pour into the street and follow the parade to Lincoln Park. There rallies would happen, information on LGBT services were made available and at least one time a mom from Pflag (Parents & Friends of Lesbians and Gays) was on hand wearing a t-shirt offering hugs to anyone needing a “Hug from mom.”

The Pride Parade is about to turn 50 and with over 1.2 million people participating in 2016, I honestly can’t wait to see what 2019 is going to be like.

Parade started Sunday, June 26, 2016, at Montrose Avenue and Broadway in Uptown and ends near the intersection of Diversey Parkway and Sheridan Road in Lincoln Park.

If you were not one of the estimated million people attending Chicago's 47th annual Pride Parade, (including Elvis and Jesus) here is some of what you missed.

Another Look at Chicago Photos by: Rick Lobes ©2016

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  • Hi Rick... Thank you for all the beautiful pictures!

    I hate doing this but our history has been so hidden that it's extremely important that the correct information is out there. It is very understandable how mistakes happen because we have no formal history as of yet but you have posted San Francisco's history as Chicago's. Below is a brief history of the Chicago Pride Parade of which I started attending in 1989 when Mayor Richard M. Daley was the first sitting mayor to appear in the parade.

    Chicago's first Pride Parade wasn't a parade at all. On June 27, 1970 the Chicago Gay Liberation organized a march to mark one year since the Stonewall Inn Gay Riots in NYC. 150-200 homosexuals marched from Washington Square Park (Bughouse Square), down Dearborn to Chicago Avenue, east to the Water Tower which was where it was to end but many of the participants extemporaneously marched on heading south on Michigan Avenue to the Civic Center (now Daley Plaza)

    In the years to follow the march would evolve into the Gay Pride Parade and finally Pride Parade to be more inclusive of the LGBTQ Community. But as someone who has seen Pride from many angles it was the time after the march up to about 1992 that I most enjoyed when it was a sort of hybrid parade/march. During those years after the last parade entry went by many of the spectators would pour into the street and follow the parade to Lincoln Park. There rallies would happen, information on LGBT services were made available and at least one time a mom from Pflag (Parents & Friends of Lesbians and Gays) was on hand wearing a t-shirt offering hugs to anyone needing a "Hug from mom."

    The Pride Parade is about to turn 50 and with over 1.2 million people participating in 2016, I honestly can't wait to see what 2019 is going to be like.

  • Thank you so much for your comments and history clarification. I should have noted the quoted history section was provided via Chicago city Parade info website.

    I will update the section with info you have provided.

    Thank you
    Rick

  • In reply to Rick Lobes:

    Absolutely dude! Thank you for the update and for being one of the few to include the history at all.

  • Best parade by far your pictures are great thanks for sharing.

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